Law in the Internet Society

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GraspingtheNet 23 - 06 Sep 2017 - Main.EbenMoglen
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Barry Lynn, I criticized Google. It got me fired. That’s how corporate power works., Washington Post, August 31, 2017
 
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-- MichaelWeholt - 05 Sep 2017
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GraspingtheNet 22 - 05 Sep 2017 - Main.MichaelWeholt
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Barry Lynn, I criticized Google. It got me fired. That’s how corporate power works., Washington Post, August 31, 2017

-- MichaelWeholt - 05 Sep 2017

 
 
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GraspingtheNet 21 - 22 Aug 2017 - Main.MichaelWeholt
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James Vincent, Transgender YouTubers had their videos grabbed to train facial recognition software, The Verge, August 22, 2017
 EPIC Files FTC Complaint to Stop Google from Tracking In-Store Purchases, Electronic Privacy Information Center, July 31, 2017 (pdf of Complaint)

Ron Lieber, American Express Kept a (Very) Watchful Eye on Charges, New York Times, January 2009


GraspingtheNet 20 - 04 Aug 2017 - Main.MichaelWeholt
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Where Credit is Due

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EPIC Files FTC Complaint to Stop Google from Tracking In-Store Purchases, Electronic Privacy Information Center, July 31, 2017 (pdf of Complaint)

 Ron Lieber, American Express Kept a (Very) Watchful Eye on Charges, New York Times, January 2009

Kashmir Hill, Data Mining CEO Says He Pays For Burgers With Cash To Avoid Junk Food Purchases Being Tracked, Forbes, June 15, 2012


GraspingtheNet 19 - 11 Sep 2014 - Main.EbenMoglen
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 John Schwartz, Professors Vie With Web for Class's Attention, New York Times, January 2, 2003
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Michael Dorf, Laptops in the Classroom, November 2006
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Having a Theory


GraspingtheNet 18 - 26 Aug 2014 - Main.IanSullivan
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 Terrence A. Maxwell, Is Copyright Necessary?, First Monday, September 2004.
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Eben Moglen, Freedom In The Cloud, Internet Society of NY, February 5, 2010

Where Credit is Due

 Ron Lieber, American Express Kept a (Very) Watchful Eye on Charges, New York Times, January 2009
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Kashmir Hill, Data Mining CEO Says He Pays For Burgers With Cash To Avoid Junk Food Purchases Being Tracked, Forbes, June 15, 2012

Alistair Croll, Big data is our generation’s civil rights issue, and we don’t know it, O'Reilly Radar, August 2, 2012

Stat oil: Lenders are turning to social media to assess borrowers, The Economist, February 9 2013

Tom Simonite, Sell Your Personal Data for $8 a Month, MIT Technology Review, February 12, 2014

Shannon Pettypiece and Jordan Robertson, Hospitals Are Mining Patients' Credit Card Data to Predict Who Will Get Sick, Bloomberg Business, July 03, 2014

 
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Sam Thielman, This Is How Your Financial Data Is Being Used to Serve You Ads, Ad Week, July 10, 2014
 
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An example of actually paying with your attention: http://socialcommercetoday.com/pay-with-a-tweet-pay-with-a-like-new-social-payments-platforms/
 
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-- AlexeySokolin - 28 Oct 2011
 
 
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GraspingtheNet 17 - 25 Aug 2014 - Main.IanSullivan
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 Angela Lewis, Hoax E-mails and Bonsai Kittens: Are You E-literate in the Docuverse?, First Monday, August 2002
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John Schwartz, Professors Vie With Web for Class's Attention, New York Times, January 2, 2003
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John Schwartz, Professors Vie With Web for Class's Attention, New York Times, January 2, 2003
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Michael Dorf, Laptops in the Classroom, November 2006


GraspingtheNet 16 - 28 Oct 2011 - Main.AlexeySokolin
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An example of actually paying with your attention: http://socialcommercetoday.com/pay-with-a-tweet-pay-with-a-like-new-social-payments-platforms/

-- AlexeySokolin - 28 Oct 2011

 
 
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GraspingtheNet 15 - 15 Sep 2011 - Main.IanSullivan
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 Edward Rothstein, Victoria's Secret, A Sex Metaphor, New York Times, February 5, 1999
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Alice McInnes, The Agency of The InfoZone: Exploring the Effects of a Community Network, First Monday, February 1997
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Alice McInnes, The Agency of The InfoZone: Exploring the Effects of a Community Network, First Monday, February 1997
 
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Angela Lewis, Hoax E-mails and Bonsai Kittens: Are You E-literate in the Docuverse?, First Monday, August 2002
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Angela Lewis, Hoax E-mails and Bonsai Kittens: Are You E-literate in the Docuverse?, First Monday, August 2002
 John Schwartz, Professors Vie With Web for Class's Attention, New York Times, January 2, 2003
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Having a Theory

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Michael H. Goldhaber, The Attention Economy: The Natural Economy of the Net, First Monday, April 1997
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Michael H. Goldhaber, The Attention Economy: The Natural Economy of the Net, First Monday, April 1997
 
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Rishab Aiyer Ghosh, Economics is dead. Long live economics!, First Monday, May 1997
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Rishab Aiyer Ghosh, Economics is dead. Long live economics!, First Monday, May 1997
 
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Philippe Aigrain, Attention, Media, Value and Economics, First Monday, September 1997
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Philippe Aigrain, Attention, Media, Value and Economics, First Monday, September 1997
 
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Rishab Aiyer Ghosh, Cooking Pot Markets: An Economic Model for the Trade in Free Goods and Services on the Internet, First Monday, March 1998
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Rishab Aiyer Ghosh, Cooking Pot Markets: An Economic Model for the Trade in Free Goods and Services on the Internet, First Monday, March 1998
 
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Terrence A. Maxwell, Is Copyright Necessary?, First Monday, September 2004.
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Terrence A. Maxwell, Is Copyright Necessary?, First Monday, September 2004.
 Ron Lieber, American Express Kept a (Very) Watchful Eye on Charges, New York Times, January 2009

GraspingtheNet 14 - 24 Sep 2009 - Main.EbenMoglen
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I just read the article about "cooking-pot" markets, which happened to comment on my "altruism" critique (last paragraph), so I will go ahead and provide a block quote, followed by a response:

"The workings of this system of trade stem from the same motivation of "fun" present when Colin Needham developed the Internet Movies Database - which, built upon newsgroup discussions, is half-dynamic. It is Needham's need to "put back" into the Net after having "taken out" so much that drives most trade in dynamic resources. It is the cooking-pot market of a seemingly altruistic value-in-giving norm that drives the economy of interacting people.

If it occured in brickspace, my cooking-pot model would require fairly altruistic participants. A real tribal communal cooking-pot works on a pretty different model, of barter and division of labour (I provide the chicken, you the goat, she the berries, together we share the spiced stew). In our hypothetical tribe, however, people give what they have into the pot with no guarantee that they're getting a fair exchange, which smacks of altruism.

But on the Net, a cooking-pot market is far from altruistic, or it wouldn't work. This is thanks to the major cause for the erosion of value on the Internet - the problem of infinity [21]. Because it takes as much effort to distribute one copy of an original creation as a million - and because the costs are distributed across millions of people - you never lose from letting your product free in the cooking-pot, as long as you are compensated for its creation. You are not giving away something for nothing. You are giving away a million copies of something, for at least one copy of at least one other thing. Since those millions cost you nothing you lose nothing. Nor need there be a notional loss of potential earnings, because those million copies are not inherently valuable - the very fact of them being a million, and theoretically a billion or more - makes them worthless. Your effort is limited to creating one - the original - copy of your product. You are happy to receive something of value in exchange for that one creation."

Response:

The concept of altruism as it is used in the quote above is too narrow. What the author believes is not a prerequisite of participation in the cooking-pot is better described as "economic altruism," where economic loss "from letting your product free in the cooking-pot" does not inhibit the creator. Even if the creator/participant receives some alternative form of value, thus getting rid of the "altruism" requirement, there are a variety of other self-serving motivations that might inhibit a participant from letting his creation go free and multiply in the pot. Some people are inherently protective of their creations for a variety of reasons that to some may appear irrational. To overcome such a variety of "irrational" or narcissistic barriers would require altruism at much higher levels of social and emotional sophistication, far beyond the economic altruism that the author describes. Reputation, or "fun," as the author mentions, might not ever enter one's mental calculus.

-- JonathanBoyer - 24 Sep 2009

 
 
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GraspingtheNet 13 - 24 Sep 2009 - Main.JonathanBoyer
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I just read the article about "cooking-pot" markets, which happened to comment on my "altruism" critique, so I will go ahead and provide a block quote, followed by a response:
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I just read the article about "cooking-pot" markets, which happened to comment on my "altruism" critique (last paragraph), so I will go ahead and provide a block quote, followed by a response:
 "The workings of this system of trade stem from the same motivation of "fun" present when Colin Needham developed the Internet Movies Database - which, built upon newsgroup discussions, is half-dynamic. It is Needham's need to "put back" into the Net after having "taken out" so much that drives most trade in dynamic resources. It is the cooking-pot market of a seemingly altruistic value-in-giving norm that drives the economy of interacting people.

GraspingtheNet 12 - 24 Sep 2009 - Main.JonathanBoyer
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 Ron Lieber, American Express Kept a (Very) Watchful Eye on Charges, New York Times, January 2009
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The Onion News Network, Google Opt Out Feature, September 2009
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I just read the article about "cooking-pot" markets, which happened to comment on my "altruism" critique, so I will go ahead and provide a block quote, followed by a response:
 
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"The workings of this system of trade stem from the same motivation of "fun" present when Colin Needham developed the Internet Movies Database - which, built upon newsgroup discussions, is half-dynamic. It is Needham's need to "put back" into the Net after having "taken out" so much that drives most trade in dynamic resources. It is the cooking-pot market of a seemingly altruistic value-in-giving norm that drives the economy of interacting people.
 
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Since this course is about the “end of the world,” I thought a bit of humor (The Onion) would be appropriate here –- to break the ice. Although humor can function in many different ways (e.g. by increasing or decreasing the psychological distances between people in groups), I hope its use as a defense mechanism in this case is mature in the sense that it might facilitate group discussion by easing tension. See generally, http://www.ehow.com/how_2294835_use-humor-as-defense-mechanism.html
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If it occured in brickspace, my cooking-pot model would require fairly altruistic participants. A real tribal communal cooking-pot works on a pretty different model, of barter and division of labour (I provide the chicken, you the goat, she the berries, together we share the spiced stew). In our hypothetical tribe, however, people give what they have into the pot with no guarantee that they're getting a fair exchange, which smacks of altruism.
 
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A few initial impressions from class:
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But on the Net, a cooking-pot market is far from altruistic, or it wouldn't work. This is thanks to the major cause for the erosion of value on the Internet - the problem of infinity [21]. Because it takes as much effort to distribute one copy of an original creation as a million - and because the costs are distributed across millions of people - you never lose from letting your product free in the cooking-pot, as long as you are compensated for its creation. You are not giving away something for nothing. You are giving away a million copies of something, for at least one copy of at least one other thing. Since those millions cost you nothing you lose nothing. Nor need there be a notional loss of potential earnings, because those million copies are not inherently valuable - the very fact of them being a million, and theoretically a billion or more - makes them worthless. Your effort is limited to creating one - the original - copy of your product. You are happy to receive something of value in exchange for that one creation."
 
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Professor Moglen’s thesis, at this early point in the course, seems to revolve around a kind of theoretical utopia of social transformation, which necessarily adds unexplored socio-psychological propositions to his argument. As of now, I am unclear as to the extent of these propositions.
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Response:
 
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If the internet is a social condition of interconnection, and if we presume for the sake of argument that the ideal condition is one that is absent of any controlling intermediary, what then is an accurate description of the resulting social transformation that evolves over time? Is there a social end-product? How long might it take until that product is ripe, and why is that product desirable?
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The concept of altruism as it is used in the quote above is too narrow. What the author believes is not a prerequisite of participation in the cooking-pot is better described as "economic altruism," where economic loss "from letting your product free in the cooking-pot" does not inhibit the creator. Even if the creator/participant receives some alternative form of value, thus getting rid of the "altruism" requirement, there are a variety of other self-serving motivations that might inhibit a participant from letting his creation go free and multiply in the pot. Some people are inherently protective of their creations for a variety of reasons that to some may appear irrational. To overcome such a variety of "irrational" or narcissistic barriers would require altruism at much higher levels of social and emotional sophistication, far beyond the economic altruism that the author describes. Reputation, or "fun," as the author mentions, might not ever enter one's mental calculus.
 
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Presumably, public networks (that do not currently exist) would house this ideal social condition of interconnection. Software and content that were once proprietary would now be shared, and citizens would be able to learn from each other in relatively unimpeded network space.
 
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Although the following thought is not yet fully formed, I would wager that a general deficiency of altruism throughout humankind is the greatest threat to Moglen’s utopia. Ultimately, human beings have a range of both individual and social desires, and happiness is derived from the satisfaction of these desires. Given the previous sentence, one might be inclined to debate the contours of human nature at this point -- a worthwhile debate -- but it is difficult to argue with the concept of a roughly stable normal curve that governs the variance of nearly all human traits. If the median of an altruism-narcissism normal curve is too narcissistic, Moglen’s utopia of public networks and unimpeded social transformation may never survive the democratic process. For some, if not most, I imagine it just feels really, really good to design a software program (or a 3rd grade curriculum plan for that matter) and then experience the self-derived “honor” that accompanies ownership and profits.
 
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-- JonathanBoyer - 23 Sep 2009
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-- JonathanBoyer - 24 Sep 2009
 
 
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GraspingtheNet 11 - 23 Sep 2009 - Main.JonathanBoyer
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 Ron Lieber, American Express Kept a (Very) Watchful Eye on Charges, New York Times, January 2009
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The Onion News Network, Google Opt Out Feature, September 2009

Since this course is about the “end of the world,” I thought a bit of humor (The Onion) would be appropriate here –- to break the ice. Although humor can function in many different ways (e.g. by increasing or decreasing the psychological distances between people in groups), I hope its use as a defense mechanism in this case is mature in the sense that it might facilitate group discussion by easing tension. See generally, http://www.ehow.com/how_2294835_use-humor-as-defense-mechanism.html

A few initial impressions from class:

Professor Moglen’s thesis, at this early point in the course, seems to revolve around a kind of theoretical utopia of social transformation, which necessarily adds unexplored socio-psychological propositions to his argument. As of now, I am unclear as to the extent of these propositions.

If the internet is a social condition of interconnection, and if we presume for the sake of argument that the ideal condition is one that is absent of any controlling intermediary, what then is an accurate description of the resulting social transformation that evolves over time? Is there a social end-product? How long might it take until that product is ripe, and why is that product desirable?

Presumably, public networks (that do not currently exist) would house this ideal social condition of interconnection. Software and content that were once proprietary would now be shared, and citizens would be able to learn from each other in relatively unimpeded network space.

Although the following thought is not yet fully formed, I would wager that a general deficiency of altruism throughout humankind is the greatest threat to Moglen’s utopia. Ultimately, human beings have a range of both individual and social desires, and happiness is derived from the satisfaction of these desires. Given the previous sentence, one might be inclined to debate the contours of human nature at this point -- a worthwhile debate -- but it is difficult to argue with the concept of a roughly stable normal curve that governs the variance of nearly all human traits. If the median of an altruism-narcissism normal curve is too narcissistic, Moglen’s utopia of public networks and unimpeded social transformation may never survive the democratic process. For some, if not most, I imagine it just feels really, really good to design a software program (or a 3rd grade curriculum plan for that matter) and then experience the self-derived “honor” that accompanies ownership and profits.

-- JonathanBoyer - 23 Sep 2009

 
 
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GraspingtheNet 10 - 23 Sep 2009 - Main.JustinColannino
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Having a Theory

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Michael H. Goldhaber, The Attention Economy: The Natural Economy of the Net, First Monday, April 1997
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Michael H. Goldhaber, The Attention Economy: The Natural Economy of the Net, First Monday, April 1997
 
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Rishab Aiyer Ghosh, Economics is dead. Long live economics!, First Monday, May 1997
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Rishab Aiyer Ghosh, Economics is dead. Long live economics!, First Monday, May 1997
 
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Philippe Aigrain, Attention, Media, Value and Economics, First Monday, September 1997
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Philippe Aigrain, Attention, Media, Value and Economics, First Monday, September 1997
 
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Rishab Aiyer Ghosh, Cooking Pot Markets: An Economic Model for the Trade in Free Goods and Services on the Internet, First Monday, March 1998
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Rishab Aiyer Ghosh, Cooking Pot Markets: An Economic Model for the Trade in Free Goods and Services on the Internet, First Monday, March 1998
 
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Terrence A. Maxwell, Is Copyright Necessary?, First Monday, September 2004.
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Terrence A. Maxwell, Is Copyright Necessary?, First Monday, September 2004.
 Ron Lieber, American Express Kept a (Very) Watchful Eye on Charges, New York Times, January 2009

GraspingtheNet 9 - 21 Sep 2009 - Main.JustinColannino
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 Edward Rothstein, Victoria's Secret, A Sex Metaphor, New York Times, February 5, 1999
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Alice McInnes, The Agency of The InfoZone: Exploring the Effects of a Community Network, First Monday, February 1997
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Alice McInnes, The Agency of The InfoZone: Exploring the Effects of a Community Network, First Monday, February 1997
 
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Angela Lewis, Hoax E-mails and Bonsai Kittens: Are You E-literate in the Docuverse?, First Monday, August 2002
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Angela Lewis, Hoax E-mails and Bonsai Kittens: Are You E-literate in the Docuverse?, First Monday, August 2002
 John Schwartz, Professors Vie With Web for Class's Attention, New York Times, January 2, 2003
Second Page (NYT's hyperlink doesn't work)

GraspingtheNet 8 - 05 Sep 2009 - Main.EbenMoglen
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 Terrence A. Maxwell, Is Copyright Necessary?, First Monday, September 2004.
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Student suggestion for future years

 Ron Lieber, American Express Kept a (Very) Watchful Eye on Charges, New York Times, January 2009
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-- TomGlaisyer - 31 Jan 2009
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GraspingtheNet 7 - 04 Sep 2009 - Main.IanSullivan
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E Pluribus Unum

Thomas L. Friedman, The Mouse That Roars: A Global Tale, New York Times, July 18, 1998


GraspingtheNet 6 - 31 Jan 2009 - Main.TomGlaisyer
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 Terrence A. Maxwell, Is Copyright Necessary?, First Monday, September 2004.
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Student suggestion for future years

Ron Lieber, American Express Kept a (Very) Watchful Eye on Charges, New York Times, January 2009 -- TomGlaisyer - 31 Jan 2009
 
 
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GraspingtheNet 5 - 19 Sep 2008 - Main.AndrewGradman
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 Angela Lewis, Hoax E-mails and Bonsai Kittens: Are You E-literate in the Docuverse?, First Monday, August 2002
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John Schwartz, Professors Vie With Web for Class's Attention, New York Times, January 2, 2003
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John Schwartz, Professors Vie With Web for Class's Attention, New York Times, January 2, 2003
Second Page (NYT's hyperlink doesn't work)
 Michael Dorf, Laptops in the Classroom, November 2006

GraspingtheNet 4 - 17 Sep 2008 - Main.JoshS
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 Jason Chervokas & Tom Watson, A Wired Generation Comes of Age on the Net, New York Times, October 31, 1997
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Victoria's Secret, A Sex Metaphor, New York Times, February 5, 1999
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Edward Rothstein, Victoria's Secret, A Sex Metaphor, New York Times, February 5, 1999
 Alice McInnes, The Agency of The InfoZone: Exploring the Effects of a Community Network, First Monday, February 1997

GraspingtheNet 3 - 04 Aug 2008 - Main.EbenMoglen
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Thomas L. Friedman, The Mouse That Roars: A Global Tale, New York Times, July 18, 1998

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* Douglas Jehl, Islamic World Opens Door to the Internet, but Restrictions Are Many, New York Times, March 18, 1999

* Robert Wright, Private Eyes, New York Times, September 5, 1999

 David J. Wallace, World Game Achieves Inventor's Vision of Global Play, New York Times, October 3, 1997

Jodi Wilgoren, Snow Day Is for Surfing as Pupils Play on Internet, New York Times, January 15, 1999


GraspingtheNet 2 - 01 Aug 2008 - Main.IanSullivan
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Thomas L. Friedman, The Mouse That Roars: A Global Tale, New York Times, July 18, 1998

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Douglas Jehl, Islamic World Opens Door to the Internet, but Restrictions Are Many, New York Times, March 18, 1999
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Robert Wright, Private Eyes, New York Times, September 5, 1999
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* Robert Wright, Private Eyes, New York Times, September 5, 1999
 David J. Wallace, World Game Achieves Inventor's Vision of Global Play, New York Times, October 3, 1997

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Thomas L. Friedman, The Mouse That Roars: A Global Tale, New York Times, July 18, 1998

Douglas Jehl, Islamic World Opens Door to the Internet, but Restrictions Are Many, New York Times, March 18, 1999

Robert Wright, Private Eyes, New York Times, September 5, 1999

David J. Wallace, World Game Achieves Inventor's Vision of Global Play, New York Times, October 3, 1997

Jodi Wilgoren, Snow Day Is for Surfing as Pupils Play on Internet, New York Times, January 15, 1999

Jason Chervokas & Tom Watson, A Wired Generation Comes of Age on the Net, New York Times, October 31, 1997

Victoria's Secret, A Sex Metaphor, New York Times, February 5, 1999

Alice McInnes, The Agency of The InfoZone: Exploring the Effects of a Community Network, First Monday, February 1997

Angela Lewis, Hoax E-mails and Bonsai Kittens: Are You E-literate in the Docuverse?, First Monday, August 2002

John Schwartz, Professors Vie With Web for Class's Attention, New York Times, January 2, 2003

Michael Dorf, Laptops in the Classroom, November 2006

Having a Theory

Michael H. Goldhaber, The Attention Economy: The Natural Economy of the Net, First Monday, April 1997

Rishab Aiyer Ghosh, Economics is dead. Long live economics!, First Monday, May 1997

Philippe Aigrain, Attention, Media, Value and Economics, First Monday, September 1997

Rishab Aiyer Ghosh, Cooking Pot Markets: An Economic Model for the Trade in Free Goods and Services on the Internet, First Monday, March 1998

Terrence A. Maxwell, Is Copyright Necessary?, First Monday, September 2004.

 
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Revision 23r23 - 06 Sep 2017 - 17:52:14 - EbenMoglen
Revision 22r22 - 05 Sep 2017 - 14:16:30 - MichaelWeholt
Revision 21r21 - 22 Aug 2017 - 16:40:23 - MichaelWeholt
Revision 20r20 - 04 Aug 2017 - 20:09:37 - MichaelWeholt
Revision 19r19 - 11 Sep 2014 - 02:21:52 - EbenMoglen
Revision 18r18 - 26 Aug 2014 - 20:34:36 - IanSullivan
Revision 17r17 - 25 Aug 2014 - 17:22:13 - IanSullivan
Revision 16r16 - 28 Oct 2011 - 14:06:41 - AlexeySokolin
Revision 15r15 - 15 Sep 2011 - 18:51:56 - IanSullivan
Revision 14r14 - 24 Sep 2009 - 20:03:53 - EbenMoglen
Revision 13r13 - 24 Sep 2009 - 03:27:35 - JonathanBoyer
Revision 12r12 - 24 Sep 2009 - 01:46:59 - JonathanBoyer
Revision 11r11 - 23 Sep 2009 - 23:08:00 - JonathanBoyer
Revision 10r10 - 23 Sep 2009 - 20:18:43 - JustinColannino
Revision 9r9 - 21 Sep 2009 - 12:40:11 - JustinColannino
Revision 8r8 - 05 Sep 2009 - 18:41:33 - EbenMoglen
Revision 7r7 - 04 Sep 2009 - 17:55:58 - IanSullivan
Revision 6r6 - 31 Jan 2009 - 15:20:38 - TomGlaisyer
Revision 5r5 - 19 Sep 2008 - 06:13:31 - AndrewGradman
Revision 4r4 - 17 Sep 2008 - 00:35:36 - JoshS
Revision 3r3 - 04 Aug 2008 - 15:48:09 - EbenMoglen
Revision 2r2 - 01 Aug 2008 - 20:11:59 - IanSullivan
Revision 1r1 - 01 Aug 2008 - 16:09:43 - IanSullivan
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