Law in Contemporary Society

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MichaelPariFirstEssay 5 - 23 May 2023 - Main.MichaelPari
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Introduction

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Madison Square Garden (MSG) launched its “attorney exclusion list” in June 2021. This forbade attorneys litigating against it or its subsidiaries from its venues via facial recognition technology. MSG claimed it enacted the policy to prevent unauthorized evidence collection. Kelly Conlon and Larry Hutcher were removed from their events despite Conlon not being admitted to the NY State Bar, and Hutcher owning season tickets for almost fifty years. Davidoff, Hutcher & Citron, launched counterattacks on the policy, challenging it in court. While NY Civil Rights Law 40(b) granted banned attorneys the right to enter theatrical performances and concerts after the doors open, the rule’s wording did not allow entry into sporting events. NY’s Appellate Division narrowed this order to exclude lawyers from other firms with active lawsuits from the relief provided to Davidoff, Hutcher & Citron. MSG’s liquor license is also under siege from state authorities.
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Madison Square Garden (MSG) launched its “attorney exclusion list” in June 2021. This forbade attorneys litigating against it or its subsidiaries from its venues via facial recognition technology. MSG claimed it enacted the policy to prevent unauthorized evidence collection. Kelly Conlon and Larry Hutcher were removed from their events despite Conlon not being admitted to the NY State Bar, and Hutcher owning season tickets for almost fifty years. Davidoff, Hutcher & Citron, launched counterattacks on the policy, challenging it in court. NY’s Appellate Division narrowed the trial court's order to exclude lawyers from other firms with active lawsuits from the relief provided to Davidoff, Hutcher & Citron. MSG’s liquor license is also under siege from state authorities.
 

Civil Rights versus Property Rights

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The instant matter strikes at the heart of the tension between the civil right to access a public venue and a fundamental property right: exclusion. On the one hand, excluded attorneys see their purchased, properly obtained right to enjoy public events stripped away. On the other, MSG sees the same happen to the use of their venue as they see fit as their list faces mounting challenges from banned lawyers and state officials alike. This debate touches on important questions about the American legal system, such as how it balances the landowner’s right to exclude with public accommodations civil rights protections and the relevance of spite in a civil action.
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The instant matter weighs the tension between the civil right to access a public venue and the property right of exclusion. Excluded attorneys see their purchased, properly obtained right to enjoy public events stripped away. On the other hand, MSG sees the same happen to the use of their venue as they see fit, as challenges to this policy escalate. This debate involves important questions about the American legal system, such as how it balances the landowner’s right to exclude with public accommodations civil rights protections and the relevance of spite in a civil action.
 

Public Accommodations Civil Rights Protections versus an Owner's Right to Exclude

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Civil rights legislation in America has been the subject of critically important discussion and has seen itself evolve drastically over the nation’s history. Many of these key legislative struggles involved attempts to either reaffirm or rectify America’s wildly disparate treatment of racial groups after the Civil War’s end.
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Civil rights legislation in America has been the subject of critically important discussion and has seen itself evolve drastically over the nation’s history. Many key legislative struggles attempted to rectify America’s wildly disparate treatment of racial groups after the Civil War’s end.
 

Constitutional Amendments

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In 1883, the Supreme Court decided on a collection of five pivotal cases involving the fifth, thirteenth and fourteenth Amendments, commonly referred to as the Civil Rights Cases. As they pertain to the matter at hand, these decisions outlined the scope of the fourteenth amendment’s ability to infringe upon the actions of a private actor. The Supreme Court conducted a narrow reading of the fourteenth amendment, limiting the scope of its equal protection provision to state action. This narrow reading of the fourteenth amendment is still good law today. Therefore, any such challenge the barred lawyers would raise using it would almost certainly fail, as both MSG and Dolan himself are private actors.

The lawyers would also likely fail to win using Yick Wo, an 1883 case in which a Chinese immigrant won when a facially objective policy regarding the operation of laundromats was applied in a discriminatory manner. Excluded lawyers could claim that the exclusion list was engineered and applied against them in a wrongly discriminatory manner. Many banned lawyers were not members of NY's bar, and/or did not know their firm was litigating against an MSG subsidiary. Thus, the lawyers could argue that their banning constituted a discriminatory application of a facially objective policy. MSG could also counter, and likely win, with the claim that Yick Wo’s operation of a business is a legal right, while watching an event at an MSG facility is merely a social right. A social right would likely not be protected even if constitutional safeguards became available against a private actor’s 14th amendment violations.

Ultimately, constitutional provisions seem to favor the private landlord’s power of exclusion over the right to enjoy public accommodations. Accordingly, most governmental safeguards’ applicability is restricted to state actions. It also must be noted that the discrimination in the Civil Rights Cases and Yick Wo was committed on the basis of the plaintiffs’ race, which is a much more important issue and grim justification than exclusion because of one’s occupation.

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In 1883, the Supreme Court decided on five pivotal cases involving the fifth, thirteenth and fourteenth Amendments, referred to as the Civil Rights Cases. As they pertain to this matter, these decisions considered whether the fourteenth amendment could target private action. The Supreme Court read the fourteenth amendment narrowly, limiting its equal protection provision to state action. This reading is still good law today. Any such challenge the barred lawyers would raise using this amendment would almost certainly fail, as both MSG and Dolan himself are private actors. The lawyers would also likely fail to win using Yick Wo, another pivotal civil rights case, because even if they successfully frame the MSG policy as facially neutral and being used in a discriminatory manner, Yick Wo’s holding also only applies to state action. Ultimately, constitutional provisions seem to favor exclusion over the right to enjoy public accommodations. Accordingly, most governmental safeguards only apply to state actions.
 

The Commerce Clause

It seems that many advances in public accommodations civil rights protections since 1865 relating to government regulation of private actors centered around whether the racist exclusion hampered interstate commerce. This was especially true in the mid-1960s when Heart of Atlanta v. US and Katzenbach v. McClung were decided. Any banned lawyers not living in NY could try to compare their situation to the plight of the Black Americans prevented from staying in the Heart of Atlanta Motel or eating in Ollie’s Diner. They could argue that, as in Heart of Atlanta and Katzenbach, MSG's rule limited interstate commerce and should be repealed accordingly.

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While this would be a closer case, it is also unlikely these arguments would prevail. The above cases were an attempt to free the country from the time’s form of horrific state-supported racism; a far cry from allowing lawyers to watch an event purely centered around entertainment. Racial groups are also a protected class, while attorneys are not. Also, when concerning rules restricting individuals not on the basis of any protected class, Williamson v. Lee Optical requires a rational basis for the restriction. While the attorneys could argue that MSG’s reasoning is pretextual, I find it unlikely that a court would hold that lawsuit protection fails to satisfy this test.
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While this would be a closer case, it is also unlikely these arguments would prevail. The above cases were an attempt to free the country from the time’s form of horrific state-supported racism; a far cry from letting lawyers watch basketball. Racial groups are also a protected class, while attorneys are not. When concerning rules restricting individuals not on the basis of any protected class, Williamson v. Lee Optical requires a rational basis for the restriction. The attorneys could argue that MSG’s reasoning is pretextual, but it is unlikely a court would decide lawsuit protection fails to satisfy this test.
 Overall, the basis of civil rights cases seems to favor groups that have been the victims of state action. When the government does regulate private actors, it tends to use interstate commerce as its justification for striking down discriminatory policies. However, I feel that applying the commerce clause here would be an overreach because of MSG’s stated basis for the bans.
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Spite Cases

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Spite Cases & State Law

Additionally, the argument that this was a policy arising chiefly from spite would also be unlikely to yield a victory for the banned attorneys. A comment in the California Law Review found a malicious motive plays no role in determining one’s civil liability, though banned lawyers could say that changing times necessitate changing this view, as it is almost 100 years old.

The most promising component of NY State Law for the banned lawyers is Civil Rights Law 40(b), as it prevents refusal for admission or ejection from public performances unless an attendee’s actions risk “breaching the peace.” The banned attorneys could counter the argument MSG provided in its statement (litigation’s adversarial nature requires bans to preempt illicit evidence gathering) with a claim that attorneys’ behavior did not breach the peace, and that MSG has yet to offer an example or other evidence of an attorney actually collecting evidence in an MSG venue in breach of proper procedure.

 
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Additionally, the argument that this was a policy arising chiefly from spite would also be unlikely to yield a victory for the banned attorneys. The California Law Review found a malicious motive plays no role in determining one’s civil liability. Therefore, the strength of the lawyers’ arguments would need to be drawn from one of the above sources.
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Banned lawyers could also join the fight against MSG’s liquor license to attack MSG’s wallet. The New York Liquor Authority sent MSG a letter claiming that its license requires that the venue remain open to the public. Also, “groups or individuals cannot be excluded on the basis of criteria that are not directly related to your duties under your [liquor] license.” The authority threatened disciplinary action in the event it finds that violations have occurred. MSG admitted that lapses in its ability to sell alcohol may materially impact its profits. Additionally, non-lawyer attendees would surely be frustrated that this dispute prevented their drinking, potentially leading to bad reviews online and other criticism. We have noted the effectiveness of “running major mouth” through Robinson’s story, and excluded lawyers would be wise to use a similar approach. The court of public opinion may be banned lawyers' best option.
 

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What was the legal question to which Yick Wo v. Hopkins was the answer? Why is no provision of New York law cited or discussed? Why is a 1938 comment in the Berkeley law review offered as authority for the content of New York law?
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MichaelPariFirstEssay 4 - 24 Apr 2023 - Main.EbenMoglen
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This draft provides a sufficient summary of the facts surrounding a dispute more likely to be visible than to be enlightening, or so I had supposed when I read the coverage. It accomplishes very well one of the most important functions of a first draft: to clear away the brush and show the question around which the next draft can grow. Here we can say the questions are: What matters in this story and why? Is this about the scope of the landlord's power to exclude commercial invitees? About the basis of public accommodations civil rights protections since 1865? About spite cases? It's the next stage, where interpretive powers are applied to the material, that real improvement occurs. Fortunately, it is not difficult to make the space needed. The current 1,000 words can be reduced to a minimal description including hypertext links to the relevant documents and coverage. A well-linked paragraph of 150 words can do the entire job, I should think, leaving 850 into which to grow.
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What was the legal question to which Yick Wo v. Hopkins was the answer? Why is no provision of New York law cited or discussed? Why is a 1938 comment in the Berkeley law review offered as authority for the content of New York law?
 


MichaelPariFirstEssay 3 - 29 Mar 2023 - Main.MichaelPari
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MSG Bans Attorneys Via Facial Recognition Software

 
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-- By MichaelPari - 16 Feb 2023
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Madison Square Garden Security Faces the Music

 

Introduction

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In June of 2021, MSG Entertainment instituted a policy prohibiting every attorney working at a firm litigating against any of MSG Entertainment’s subsidiaries from entering their venues. The “attorney exclusion list” bars attorneys from any MSG Entertainment facilities, including its namesake Madison Square Garden, and Radio City Music Hall. The enactment of such a wide-ranged policy is being carried out via facial recognition technology. This ban also applies to MSG theaters outside of New York, though the use of such software varies based on local regulations.
>
>
Madison Square Garden (MSG) launched its “attorney exclusion list” in June 2021. This forbade attorneys litigating against it or its subsidiaries from its venues via facial recognition technology. MSG claimed it enacted the policy to prevent unauthorized evidence collection. Kelly Conlon and Larry Hutcher were removed from their events despite Conlon not being admitted to the NY State Bar, and Hutcher owning season tickets for almost fifty years. Davidoff, Hutcher & Citron, launched counterattacks on the policy, challenging it in court. While NY Civil Rights Law 40(b) granted banned attorneys the right to enter theatrical performances and concerts after the doors open, the rule’s wording did not allow entry into sporting events. NY’s Appellate Division narrowed this order to exclude lawyers from other firms with active lawsuits from the relief provided to Davidoff, Hutcher & Citron. MSG’s liquor license is also under siege from state authorities.

Civil Rights versus Property Rights

The instant matter strikes at the heart of the tension between the civil right to access a public venue and a fundamental property right: exclusion. On the one hand, excluded attorneys see their purchased, properly obtained right to enjoy public events stripped away. On the other, MSG sees the same happen to the use of their venue as they see fit as their list faces mounting challenges from banned lawyers and state officials alike. This debate touches on important questions about the American legal system, such as how it balances the landowner’s right to exclude with public accommodations civil rights protections and the relevance of spite in a civil action.

Public Accommodations Civil Rights Protections versus an Owner's Right to Exclude

Civil rights legislation in America has been the subject of critically important discussion and has seen itself evolve drastically over the nation’s history. Many of these key legislative struggles involved attempts to either reaffirm or rectify America’s wildly disparate treatment of racial groups after the Civil War’s end.

Constitutional Amendments

In 1883, the Supreme Court decided on a collection of five pivotal cases involving the fifth, thirteenth and fourteenth Amendments, commonly referred to as the Civil Rights Cases. As they pertain to the matter at hand, these decisions outlined the scope of the fourteenth amendment’s ability to infringe upon the actions of a private actor. The Supreme Court conducted a narrow reading of the fourteenth amendment, limiting the scope of its equal protection provision to state action. This narrow reading of the fourteenth amendment is still good law today. Therefore, any such challenge the barred lawyers would raise using it would almost certainly fail, as both MSG and Dolan himself are private actors.

The lawyers would also likely fail to win using Yick Wo, an 1883 case in which a Chinese immigrant won when a facially objective policy regarding the operation of laundromats was applied in a discriminatory manner. Excluded lawyers could claim that the exclusion list was engineered and applied against them in a wrongly discriminatory manner. Many banned lawyers were not members of NY's bar, and/or did not know their firm was litigating against an MSG subsidiary. Thus, the lawyers could argue that their banning constituted a discriminatory application of a facially objective policy. MSG could also counter, and likely win, with the claim that Yick Wo’s operation of a business is a legal right, while watching an event at an MSG facility is merely a social right. A social right would likely not be protected even if constitutional safeguards became available against a private actor’s 14th amendment violations.

Ultimately, constitutional provisions seem to favor the private landlord’s power of exclusion over the right to enjoy public accommodations. Accordingly, most governmental safeguards’ applicability is restricted to state actions. It also must be noted that the discrimination in the Civil Rights Cases and Yick Wo was committed on the basis of the plaintiffs’ race, which is a much more important issue and grim justification than exclusion because of one’s occupation.

 
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Who is affected

Attorneys from approximately 90 firms that are on the opposing side of litigation against MSG have been prohibited from entering their arenas. Lawyers who are not a part of the actual lawsuit versus MSG Entertainment, or even admitted to the bar in the state of New York, are still placed on the exclusion list. Photographs of the attorneys have been entered into MSG’s facial recognition software after being taken from the law firms’ websites themselves. Once inputted, scanning software combs the crowd for any attorney entered into its database, and guards are deployed to escort them out. While MSG Entertainment has not said which facial recognition software company it uses, several on the market can accomplish such a feat.
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The Commerce Clause

 
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It seems that many advances in public accommodations civil rights protections since 1865 relating to government regulation of private actors centered around whether the racist exclusion hampered interstate commerce. This was especially true in the mid-1960s when Heart of Atlanta v. US and Katzenbach v. McClung were decided. Any banned lawyers not living in NY could try to compare their situation to the plight of the Black Americans prevented from staying in the Heart of Atlanta Motel or eating in Ollie’s Diner. They could argue that, as in Heart of Atlanta and Katzenbach, MSG's rule limited interstate commerce and should be repealed accordingly.
 
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Why is this happening

Madison Square Garden offered lawsuit-related reasons for the blanket ban across almost 100 law firms, though they seem far less likely than an attempt to deter lawsuits. First, MSG Entertainment issued a statement saying that this ban was enacted to stop lawyers from collecting evidence “outside proper litigation discovery channels.” Given the “inherently adversarial environment” litigation brings about, MSG Entertainment feels it needs to protect itself from those who seek to harm it. MSG also claimed that barring lawyers from its facilities prevents any individual lawyer representing the plaintiff from discussing their lawsuit with the respective MSG Entertainment employee. One lawyer who fell victim to the ban quipped back, comparing the odds of this happening to “being struck by lightning or the Knicks winning the NBA championship this year.” Such a conversation, or a similarly-unethical surveillance effort seems much less likely than someone merely going to a concert hall to see a concert.
>
>
While this would be a closer case, it is also unlikely these arguments would prevail. The above cases were an attempt to free the country from the time’s form of horrific state-supported racism; a far cry from allowing lawyers to watch an event purely centered around entertainment. Racial groups are also a protected class, while attorneys are not. Also, when concerning rules restricting individuals not on the basis of any protected class, Williamson v. Lee Optical requires a rational basis for the restriction. While the attorneys could argue that MSG’s reasoning is pretextual, I find it unlikely that a court would hold that lawsuit protection fails to satisfy this test.
 
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Case studies

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Overall, the basis of civil rights cases seems to favor groups that have been the victims of state action. When the government does regulate private actors, it tends to use interstate commerce as its justification for striking down discriminatory policies. However, I feel that applying the commerce clause here would be an overreach because of MSG’s stated basis for the bans.
 
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Larry Hutcher

Hutcher has owned season tickets to the Knicks for almost fifty years, and sat just five rows behind the basket. However, when Davidoff Hutcher & Citron LLP, a firm comprised of sixty attorneys, took a case representing twenty-four disgruntled ticket resellers, the multi-billion-dollar enterprise they targeted exacted its vengeance. Just over a week after filing the lawsuit, Hal Weidenfeld, MSG Entertainment’s senior vice president for legal and business affairs, sent the firm a letter that said all of their attorneys were banned from entering the venue until the litigation was over.
 
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Spite Cases

 
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Kelly Conlon

Conlon took her daughter to New York City as part of a Girl Scout trip to see the Christmas Spectacular Show at Radio City Music Hall. While she passed through the metal detector, a voice came through the intercom: “woman with long dark hair and a gray scarf.” After being told she had been identified via facial recognition, Conlon explained that she was not a threat to the concert or any of its attendees. Conlon claimed that security staff “knew my name before I told them. They knew the firm I was associated with before I told them. And they told me I was not allowed to be there.” Even after explaining that she did not practice in New York, and was not involved in any cases against MSG, she was still forced out of the venue. While her daughter, the rest of her Girl Scout troop, and all the other parents who made the trek to the concert got to enjoy the show, Conlan was barred because of a petty grievance involving a case she was nowhere near.
>
>
Additionally, the argument that this was a policy arising chiefly from spite would also be unlikely to yield a victory for the banned attorneys. The California Law Review found a malicious motive plays no role in determining one’s civil liability. Therefore, the strength of the lawyers’ arguments would need to be drawn from one of the above sources.
 
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Lack of good-faith notification

Attorneys with no pending or ongoing litigation have no reason to suspect anything may be amiss when purchasing a ticket. Also, depending on the size and scale of one’s practice, keeping up with every case being taken is not feasible. Notifications confirming the existence of the list are not easily visible, to the extent they are visible at all, when purchasing a ticket. Attorneys are removed from the venue at all stages of the process, with one recalling being taken out after reaching his seat and making it through a metal detector and area with trained dogs. This person was clearly not a safety concern, as, were they attempting to do harm, one of these measures would have easily detected their devices for executing such a plan. Additionally, after a ticket has been scanned, it cannot be sold to someone else, rendering the good-faith purchaser with no money and no entertainment.
 
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NYC authority figures’ stances and Dolan’s response

The New York Attorney General launched a civil suit in response to the bans. 40-B of NYC’s code prohibits “wrongful refusal of admission to and ejection from places of public entertainment and amusement,” and is being used to combat Dolan’s petty grievance. Additionally, allowing such a policy to stay in place risks MSG being able to shield itself from many future lawsuits, as attorneys will not want to be excluded. The NY State Senate is looking to pass a bill allowing anyone with a valid ticket to enter a public place, as another method of combatting the ban within the legal sphere. This bill is intended to stop the use of surveillance for non-security purposes. The State Liquor Association threatened MSG’s liquor license, as an attempt to hurt the company’s bottom line. Dolan responded telling politicians to solve actual problems, as opposed to advocating on behalf of “money grabbers whose business is motivated by self-promotion and who capitalize on the misfortune of others.” He also threatened to display a picture, email, and phone number of SLA CEO Sharif Kabir in the arena, and urge fans to harass him.
 


MichaelPariFirstEssay 2 - 19 Feb 2023 - Main.EbenMoglen
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  Dolan responded telling politicians to solve actual problems, as opposed to advocating on behalf of “money grabbers whose business is motivated by self-promotion and who capitalize on the misfortune of others.” He also threatened to display a picture, email, and phone number of SLA CEO Sharif Kabir in the arena, and urge fans to harass him.
Added:
>
>
This draft provides a sufficient summary of the facts surrounding a dispute more likely to be visible than to be enlightening, or so I had supposed when I read the coverage. It accomplishes very well one of the most important functions of a first draft: to clear away the brush and show the question around which the next draft can grow. Here we can say the questions are: What matters in this story and why? Is this about the scope of the landlord's power to exclude commercial invitees? About the basis of public accommodations civil rights protections since 1865? About spite cases? It's the next stage, where interpretive powers are applied to the material, that real improvement occurs. Fortunately, it is not difficult to make the space needed. The current 1,000 words can be reduced to a minimal description including hypertext links to the relevant documents and coverage. A well-linked paragraph of 150 words can do the entire job, I should think, leaving 850 into which to grow.
 
Deleted:
<
<

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MichaelPariFirstEssay 1 - 16 Feb 2023 - Main.MichaelPari
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META TOPICPARENT name="FirstEssay"

MSG Bans Attorneys Via Facial Recognition Software

-- By MichaelPari - 16 Feb 2023

Introduction

In June of 2021, MSG Entertainment instituted a policy prohibiting every attorney working at a firm litigating against any of MSG Entertainment’s subsidiaries from entering their venues. The “attorney exclusion list” bars attorneys from any MSG Entertainment facilities, including its namesake Madison Square Garden, and Radio City Music Hall. The enactment of such a wide-ranged policy is being carried out via facial recognition technology. This ban also applies to MSG theaters outside of New York, though the use of such software varies based on local regulations.

Who is affected

Attorneys from approximately 90 firms that are on the opposing side of litigation against MSG have been prohibited from entering their arenas. Lawyers who are not a part of the actual lawsuit versus MSG Entertainment, or even admitted to the bar in the state of New York, are still placed on the exclusion list. Photographs of the attorneys have been entered into MSG’s facial recognition software after being taken from the law firms’ websites themselves. Once inputted, scanning software combs the crowd for any attorney entered into its database, and guards are deployed to escort them out. While MSG Entertainment has not said which facial recognition software company it uses, several on the market can accomplish such a feat.

Why is this happening

Madison Square Garden offered lawsuit-related reasons for the blanket ban across almost 100 law firms, though they seem far less likely than an attempt to deter lawsuits. First, MSG Entertainment issued a statement saying that this ban was enacted to stop lawyers from collecting evidence “outside proper litigation discovery channels.” Given the “inherently adversarial environment” litigation brings about, MSG Entertainment feels it needs to protect itself from those who seek to harm it. MSG also claimed that barring lawyers from its facilities prevents any individual lawyer representing the plaintiff from discussing their lawsuit with the respective MSG Entertainment employee. One lawyer who fell victim to the ban quipped back, comparing the odds of this happening to “being struck by lightning or the Knicks winning the NBA championship this year.” Such a conversation, or a similarly-unethical surveillance effort seems much less likely than someone merely going to a concert hall to see a concert.

Case studies

Larry Hutcher

Hutcher has owned season tickets to the Knicks for almost fifty years, and sat just five rows behind the basket. However, when Davidoff Hutcher & Citron LLP, a firm comprised of sixty attorneys, took a case representing twenty-four disgruntled ticket resellers, the multi-billion-dollar enterprise they targeted exacted its vengeance. Just over a week after filing the lawsuit, Hal Weidenfeld, MSG Entertainment’s senior vice president for legal and business affairs, sent the firm a letter that said all of their attorneys were banned from entering the venue until the litigation was over.

Kelly Conlon

Conlon took her daughter to New York City as part of a Girl Scout trip to see the Christmas Spectacular Show at Radio City Music Hall. While she passed through the metal detector, a voice came through the intercom: “woman with long dark hair and a gray scarf.” After being told she had been identified via facial recognition, Conlon explained that she was not a threat to the concert or any of its attendees. Conlon claimed that security staff “knew my name before I told them. They knew the firm I was associated with before I told them. And they told me I was not allowed to be there.” Even after explaining that she did not practice in New York, and was not involved in any cases against MSG, she was still forced out of the venue. While her daughter, the rest of her Girl Scout troop, and all the other parents who made the trek to the concert got to enjoy the show, Conlan was barred because of a petty grievance involving a case she was nowhere near.

Lack of good-faith notification

Attorneys with no pending or ongoing litigation have no reason to suspect anything may be amiss when purchasing a ticket. Also, depending on the size and scale of one’s practice, keeping up with every case being taken is not feasible. Notifications confirming the existence of the list are not easily visible, to the extent they are visible at all, when purchasing a ticket. Attorneys are removed from the venue at all stages of the process, with one recalling being taken out after reaching his seat and making it through a metal detector and area with trained dogs. This person was clearly not a safety concern, as, were they attempting to do harm, one of these measures would have easily detected their devices for executing such a plan. Additionally, after a ticket has been scanned, it cannot be sold to someone else, rendering the good-faith purchaser with no money and no entertainment.

NYC authority figures’ stances and Dolan’s response

The New York Attorney General launched a civil suit in response to the bans. 40-B of NYC’s code prohibits “wrongful refusal of admission to and ejection from places of public entertainment and amusement,” and is being used to combat Dolan’s petty grievance. Additionally, allowing such a policy to stay in place risks MSG being able to shield itself from many future lawsuits, as attorneys will not want to be excluded. The NY State Senate is looking to pass a bill allowing anyone with a valid ticket to enter a public place, as another method of combatting the ban within the legal sphere. This bill is intended to stop the use of surveillance for non-security purposes. The State Liquor Association threatened MSG’s liquor license, as an attempt to hurt the company’s bottom line. Dolan responded telling politicians to solve actual problems, as opposed to advocating on behalf of “money grabbers whose business is motivated by self-promotion and who capitalize on the misfortune of others.” He also threatened to display a picture, email, and phone number of SLA CEO Sharif Kabir in the arena, and urge fans to harass him.

Note: TWiki has strict formatting rules for preference declarations. Make sure you preserve the three spaces, asterisk, and extra space at the beginning of these lines. If you wish to give access to any other users simply add them to the comma separated ALLOWTOPICVIEW list.


Revision 5r5 - 23 May 2023 - 19:33:29 - MichaelPari
Revision 4r4 - 24 Apr 2023 - 15:20:52 - EbenMoglen
Revision 3r3 - 29 Mar 2023 - 19:38:09 - MichaelPari
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Revision 1r1 - 16 Feb 2023 - 17:06:23 - MichaelPari
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